How to create Index in database

One of the most important routes to high performance in a SQL Server database is the index. Indexes speed up the querying process by providing swift access to rows in the data tables, similarly to the way a book’s index helps you find information quickly within that book. In this article, I provide an overview of SQL Server indexes and explain how they’re defined within a database and how they can make the querying process faster. Most of this information applies to indexes in both SQL Server 2005 and 2008; the basic structure has changed little from one version to the next. In fact, much of the information also applies to SQL Server 2000. This does not mean there haven’t been changes. New functionality has been added with each successive version; however, the underlying structures have remained relatively the same. So for the sake of brevity, I stick with 2005 and 2008 and point out where there are differences in those two versions.

Index Structures

Indexes are created on columns in tables or views. The index provides a fast way to look up data based on the values within those columns. For example, if you create an index on the primary key and then search for a row of data based on one of the primary key values, SQL Server first finds that value in the index, and then uses the index to quickly locate the entire row of data. Without the index, a table scan would have to be performed in order to locate the row, which can have a significant effect on performance.

You can create indexes on most columns in a table or a view. The exceptions are primarily those columns configured with large object (LOB) data types, such as image, text, and varchar(max). You can also create indexes on XML columns, but those indexes are slightly different from the basic index and are beyond the scope of this article. Instead, I’ll focus on those indexes that are implemented most commonly in a SQL Server database.

An index is made up of a set of pages (index nodes) that are organized in a B-tree structure. This structure is hierarchical in nature, with the root node at the top of the hierarchy and the leaf nodes at the bottom, as shown in Figure 1.

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Figure 1: B-tree structure of a SQL Server index

When a query is issued against an indexed column, the query engine starts at the root node and navigates down through the intermediate nodes, with each layer of the intermediate level more granular than the one above. The query engine continues down through the index nodes until it reaches the leaf node. For example, if you’re searching for the value 123 in an indexed column, the query engine would first look in the root level to determine which page to reference in the top intermediate level. In this example, the first page points the values 1-100, and the second page, the values 101-200, so the query engine would go to the second page on that level. The query engine would then determine that it must go to the third page at the next intermediate level. From there, the query engine would navigate to the leaf node for value 123. The leaf node will contain either the entire row of data or a pointer to that row, depending on whether the index is clustered or nonclustered.




Clustered Indexes

A clustered index stores the actual data rows at the leaf level of the index. Returning to the example above, that would mean that the entire row of data associated with the primary key value of 123 would be stored in that leaf node. An important characteristic of the clustered index is that the indexed values are sorted in either ascending or descending order. As a result, there can be only one clustered index on a table or view. In addition, data in a table is sorted only if a clustered index has been defined on a table.

Note: A table that has a clustered index is referred to as a clustered table. A table that has no clustered index is referred to as a heap.

Nonclustered Indexes

Unlike a clustered indexed, the leaf nodes of a nonclustered index contain only the values from the indexed columns and row locators that point to the actual data rows, rather than contain the data rows themselves. This means that the query engine must take an additional step in order to locate the actual data.

A row locator’s structure depends on whether it points to a clustered table or to a heap. If referencing a clustered table, the row locator points to the clustered index, using the value from the clustered index to navigate to the correct data row. If referencing a heap, the row locator points to the actual data row.

Nonclustered indexes cannot be sorted like clustered indexes; however, you can create more than one nonclustered index per table or view. SQL Server 2005 supports up to 249 nonclustered indexes, and SQL Server 2008 support up to 999. This certainly doesn’t mean you should create that many indexes. Indexes can both help and hinder performance, as I explain later in the article.

In addition to being able to create multiple nonclustered indexes on a table or view, you can also add included columns to your index. This means that you can store at the leaf level not only the values from the indexed column, but also the values from non-indexed columns. This strategy allows you to get around some of the limitations on indexes. For example, you can include non-indexed columns in order to exceed the size limit of indexed columns (900 bytes in most cases).

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