Download the Videos You’ve Uploaded to YouTube

October 2, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, YouTube 

YouTube lets you download the videos you’ve uploaded to the service, but the feature has a lot of limitations. “You can download MP4s of your own uploads, so as long as they do not have any copyrighted content or an audio track added through the Audio tool.” But that’s not all: “there is a limit of two downloads per hour for downloading your video to MP4. The Download MP4 button will not appear next to your videos if you’ve already downloaded two videos in an hour.”
The limitations are absurd, considering that they are your videos and you’ve uploaded them. There are many services and apps that let you download any YouTube video, but they break YouTube’s terms of services.




Fortunately, Google’s Data Liberation launched a much better feature in Google Takeout: download the original videos you’ve uploaded to YouTube with one click. That’s right, no more limitations, you can download all your videos and it’s the only way to get the original versions, not the videos transcoded by YouTube. “No transcoding or transformation – you’ll get exactly the same videos that you first uploaded. Your videos in. Your videos out,” explains Google.
Hopefully YouTube doesn’t find out about this feature and cripple it with some preposterous limitations.

{ Thanks, Herin. }

Simplified SSO login screen in Google Apps Sync for Microsoft Outlook

August 22, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, Google 

The login dialog for users who have enabled Single Sign On (SSO) login to Google Apps, but not Google password login has been simplified (shows only one option for entering a password), and the authentication landing page better redirects users back to the Google Apps Sync application.

Google Apps – Delivery Manager: A new way to manage email routing

August 22, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, Google 

Google Apps administrators can use a new feature in the administrator control panel to manage routing and basic filtering of email to on-premise systems as well as email to Google Apps users. These changes are a part of the integration of Postini and Google Apps.

Google: Building the search engine of the future, one baby step at a time

August 11, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, Google 

Larry Page once described the perfect search engine as understanding exactly what you mean and giving you back exactly what you want. It’s very much like the computer I dreamt about as a child growing up in India, glued to our black-and-white TV for every episode of Star Trek. I imagined a future where a starship computer would be able to answer any question I might ask, instantly. Today, we’re closer to that dream than I ever thought possible during my working life—and here are some of the latest steps we’re taking today to make search even more intelligent:

1. Understanding the world
In May we launched the Knowledge Graph, our database of more than 500 million real-world people, places and things with 3.5 billion attributes and connections among them. The feedback has been phenomenally positive and we want to extend this feature to people outside the U.S. So starting today, you’ll see Knowledge Graph results across every English-speaking country in the world. If you’re in Australia and search for [chiefs], you’ll get the rugby team—its players, results and history.

We’ll also use this intelligence to help you find the right result more quickly when your search may have different meanings. For example, if you search for [rio], you might be interested in the Brazilian city, the recent animated movie or the casino in Vegas. Thanks to the Knowledge Graph, we can now give you these different suggestions of real-world entities in the search box as you type:

Finally, the best answer to your question is not always a single entity, but a list or group of connected things. It’s quite challenging to pull these lists automatically from the web. But we’re now beginning to do just that. So when you search for [california lighthouses], [hurricanes in 2008] or [famous female astronomers], we’ll show you a list of these things across the top of the page. And by combining our Knowledge Graph with the collective wisdom of the web, we can even provide more subjective lists like [best action movies of the 2000s] or [things to do in paris]. If you click on an item, you can then explore the result more deeply on the web:

So far we can produce hundreds of thousands of lists involving millions of items, and we’ll keep growing to match your curiosity. A quick preview:

2. Putting your info at your fingertips
Sometimes the best answer to your question isn’t available on the public web—it may be contained somewhere else, such as in your email. We think you shouldn’t have to be your own mini-search engine to find the most useful information—it should just work. A search is a search, and we want our results to be truly universal. So we’re developing a way to find this information for you that’s useful and unobtrusive, and we’d love your feedback. Starting today, we’re opening up a limited trial where you can sign up to get information from your Gmail right from the search box.

So if you’re planning a biking trip to Tahoe, you might see relevant emails from friends about the best bike trails, or great places to eat on the right hand side of the results page. If it looks relevant you can then expand the box to read the emails:

We’re working on some even more useful features. For example, if you search for [my flights] we will organize flight confirmation emails for any upcoming trips in a beautifully easy-to-read way right on the search results page:

3. Understanding your intent
Often the most natural way to ask a question is by asking aloud. So we’ve combined our speech recognition expertise, understanding of language and the Knowledge Graph so that Voice Search can better interpret your questions and sometimes speak the answers back as full sentences. This has been available on Android for a few weeks and people love it. It’ll soon be available on your iPhone or iPad (iOS version 4.2+).

You just need to tap the microphone icon and ask your question, the same way you’d ask a friend. For example, ask “What movies are playing this weekend?” and you’ll see your words streamed back to you quickly as you speak. Then Google will show you a list of the latest movies in theaters near you, with schedules and even trailers. It works for everything from celebrity factoids to the height of Kilamanjaro and more. When Google can supply a direct answer to your question, you’ll get a spoken response too.

These are baby steps, but important ones on our way to building the search engine of the future—one that is much more intelligent and useful than it was just a few years ago. It’s a very exciting time to be working in this field.

Posted by Amit Singhal, SVP Google Search

Video chat with multiple people with Hangouts in Gmail

August 11, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, Google 

Video chat in Gmail has been upgraded and is now powered by Google+ Hangouts. If both sides have created a Google+ profile you will get the full Hangouts experience including the ability to add up to nine other people to the conversation, screen sharing and integrated Google Docs collaboration.

YouTube @ the Google Developers Academy

July 16, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, YouTube 

Whether you’re a fledgling developer looking to get started with an API or a skilled developer who wants to learn some new tricks, you’ll find engaging material at the Google Developers Academy. Of particular interest to readers of this blog is the YouTube section, which hosts courses specific to the YouTube APIs.

The first course walks JavaScript developers through the steps needed to embed an <iframe> Player on their page along with a list of chapter titles. It’s perfect when you want to embed a lengthy video that consists of multiple sub-sections, since jumping from section to section is as easy as clicking on predefined links. Check out the live demo of a page with videos from last year’s Google I/O conference to see the player in action.

We will be gradually adding to the YouTube section of the Google Developers Academy, and we’ll announce the new courses on this blog and our YouTube for Developers Google+ page. Stay tuned for more great resources!

Cheers,
Jeff Posnick, YouTube API Team

Build awesome YouTube experiences with new APIs and tools

July 1, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, YouTube 

When we introduced the first YouTube API in 2005, we knew that it would be developers who would help us grow YouTube as a platform for connecting the world through video. At this year’s Google I/O, we’re continuing on with that mission through an entire track dedicated to YouTube, where we’re announcing new APIs and developer tools, as
well as a showcase of some of the most innovative apps built with YouTube.

Make mobile video shine
With mobile video now making up as much as half of all mobile traffic, your mobile experience needs video that’s high quality, fast and sleek. We want to give you the best tools to build these experiences, so we’re previewing the new YouTube Android Player API for high-quality and fluid video playback.

Engage with your communities through video
The next generation of YouTube Direct allows you to engage with your community by having them submit videos which you can then feature in playlists. YouTube Direct Lite is implemented in client-side JavaScript using CORS, and does not require any server-side deployments—adding it to your site is as simple as adding an

MMMmmm…data!Retrieving analytics data for your videos used to mean downloading an archive of CSV files that you then had to process. Now, you can use our new YouTube Analytics API to build custom tools for your data. It’s a RESTful web service that gives you the freedom to request customized reports containing only the data you care about. We’re also giving the YouTube Data API a facelift with new features like universal search and updated client libraries in 8 different languages.

Play, watch and learn from developers like you at Google I/O

We’ll be talking about these new features and other developer tools at Google I/O this week, so check out our sessions and codelabs, download the official Google I/O app, and follow online at developers.google.com/io. At I/O you can also visit with Developer Sandbox companies like Flipboard, Dude Perfect and SONY PlayStation @ Home who are building awesome experiences with YouTube APIs. We’ll also share our sessions on the Google Developers YouTube Channel, and you can always find us on Google+ and our developer forum.

Cheers,
—Amanda Surya, YouTube API Team

YouTube : All Good Things Must Come to an end=

July 1, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, YouTube 

If you enjoy the ability to easily start video playback at a specific time using the start parameter, you may also like being able to stop it early. Here’s an example:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Nc9xq-TVyHI?start=110&end=119" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

The end parameter is a positive integer, and it represents the number of seconds from the beginning of the video. If your friends are not into merengue dancing canines, you can now tease them with short clips of videos like the one below:
Cheers,
–Jarek Wilkiewicz, YouTube API Team

Google Cloud: Energy efficiency in the cloud

June 18, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, Google 

According to Google

At Google, we’re obsessed with building energy efficient data centers that enable cloud computing. Besides helping you be more productive, cloud-based services like Google Apps can reduce energy use, lower carbon emissions and save you money in the process. Last year, we crunched the numbers and found that Gmail is up to 80 times more energy-efficient than running traditional in-house email. We’ve sharpened our pencils again to see how Google Apps as a whole—documents, spreadsheets, email and other applications—stacks up against the standard model of locally hosted services. Our results show that a typical organization can achieve energy savings of about 65-85% by migrating to Google Apps.

Lower energy use results in less carbon pollution and more energy saved for organizations. That’s what happened at the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), which recently switched its 17,000 users to Google Apps for Government. We found that the GSA was able to reduce server energy consumption by nearly 90% and carbon emissions by 85%. That means the GSA will save an estimated $285,000 annually on energy costs alone, a 93% cost reduction.

How is the cloud so energy efficient? It’s all about reducing energy use for servers and server cooling. Here’s how it works:


A typical organization has a lot more servers than it needs—for backup, failures and spikes in demand for computing. Cloud-based service providers like Google aggregate demand across thousands of people, substantially increasing how much servers are utilized. And our data centers use equipment and software specially designed to minimize energy use. The cloud can do the same work much more efficiently than locally hosted servers.

In fact, according to a study by the Carbon Disclosure Project, by migrating to the cloud, companies with over $1 billion in revenues in the U.S. and Europe could achieve substantial reductions in energy costs and carbon emissions by 2020:

  • US companies could save $12.3 billion and up to 85.7 million metric tonnes of CO2
  • UK companies would save £1.2 billion and more than 9.2 million metric tonnes of CO2
  • French companies could save nearly €700 million and 1.2 million metric tonnes of CO2

We’ve built efficient data centers all over the world, even designing them in ways that make the best use of the natural environment, and we continue working to improve their performance. We think using the super-efficient cloud to deliver services like Google Apps can be part of the solution towards a more energy efficient future.

Posted by Urs Hoelzle, Senior Vice President for Technical Infrastructure

(Cross-posted on the Google Green Blog)

The YouTube Player: Now with 30% More Playlistiness!

June 17, 2012 · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Featured, YouTube 

When Youtube launched support for lists of videos in the YouTube player in March, it was greeted with a lot of enthusiasm. However, some developers pointed out that at first glance it didn’t look very much like a playlist. In particular, they wanted the list of video thumbnails to be visible all the time.

Well, you guys asked for it, and we listened. If you pass a parameter, showinfo=1, when creating the player, the list of video thumbnails will be permanently visible. Here’s an example:

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/?listType=user_uploads&list=GoogleDevelopers&showinfo=1” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

The corresponding embedded player is shown below:

To see all of the parameters that the YouTube player supports, refer to the documentation. If you have any questions, feel free to post them to the YouTube API Google Group.

Cheers,
—Shannon -jj Behrens, YouTube API Team

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